Archive for the ‘Golf.com’ Category

Try this 3-level system for laserlike wedges   Leave a comment

To hit the ball half the distance that you normally would, rotate your body about a quarter of the way back and bring your hands up to your hips. Only allow your wrists to hinge halfway. From this backswing position, you should be able to hit the ball 50 percent of your normal full-swing distance for that particular wedge. The ball should also come out on a much lower trajectory, which is good for attacking back pin locations. Remember to rotate your torso through the shot and swing to a full finish.

SWING 1: HIP LEVEL (50% OF YOUR NORMAL FULL-SWING DISTANCE)

 Power Hitter  To hit the ball half the distance that you normally would, rotate your body about a quarter of the way back and bring your hands up to your hips. Only allow your wrists to hinge halfway. From this backswing position, you should be able to hit the ball 50 percent of your normal full-swing distance for that particular wedge. The ball should also come out on a much lower trajectory, which is good for attacking back pin locations. Remember to rotate your torso through the shot and swing to a full finish.

SWING 2: CHEST LEVEL (75% OF YOUR NORMAL FULL-SWING DISTANCE)

 Power Hitter  To carry the ball 75 percent of your full distance, rotate your body about three-quarters of the way back and bring your arms and hands to chest height. Hinge your wrists fully so that your leading arm and the clubshaft form the letter "L." From this mid-length swing position, you’ll generate a little more clubhead speed and power and carry the ball on a medium trajectory, ideal for center pin locations.

SWING 3: SHOULDER LEVEL (100% OF YOUR NORMAL FULL-SWING DISTANCE)

 Power Hitter  To get the maximum distance (i.e., 100 percent) out of your wedges while maintaining a high level of accuracy, make a full body turn and swing your hands up to shoulder height—but no farther. Again, make sure to hinge your wrists fully and swing to a full finish. You can expect a higher-trajectory ball flight and greater stopping power, which makes it much easier to attack those difficult front and tucked pin locations.

Advertisements

Posted 14 October, 2017 by E. Marino in Golf.com

Swinging past parallel could be just what your game needs   Leave a comment

PASTYou want more distance. You need more speed. Here’s how the math works: for every mile-per-hour you add to your driver swing, you can tack on three extra yards off the tee. You can gain 10 mph simply by swinging past parallel. That’s 30 extra yards!

Getting past parallel isn’t about extending your arms back higher or farther, or forcing a shoulder turn your body isn’t capable of making. Your key: Become "softer" at the top of your backswing. Allow your wrists to hinge fully and your elbows to bend a bit more than normal

It should feel like the clubhead is "dipping" a few inches at the top. That little dip means your driver has to travel just that much farther to get back to the ball, giving you extra time to build speed. The idea is to reach max velocity when the clubhead meets ball. Now go hit it like you mean it!

Posted 14 October, 2017 by E. Marino in Golf.com

How to get more out of your long bunker shots   Leave a comment

If you’re the kind of golfer who makes freenside bunker shots look easy, but back up 15 to 20 yards and find it almost impossible to get the ball to the hole, it’s time to understand technique.

Why? Because your greenside maneuver doesn’t generate the necessary clubhead speed to get the ball close from 30 or 40 yards. You need more speed for longer blasts, and the way to get it is to make the following two swing adjustments.

STEP 1: SWING BIG

 LOW HANDICAPPER  Make a full turn as though you were trying to hit a full 7-iron—you should turn until your left shoulder is under your chin and your back is facing the target. Most amateurs don’t make a big enough backswing on these shots and instead try to muscle the ball out of the sand. That’s how you take too much sand and come up way short of the hole. Make a big turn both back and through—pretend you have 140 yards to the pin, rather than 40.

STEP 2: EXTEND THE RIGHT ELBOW

 LOW HANDICAPPER  Unlike a short or mid-range greenside bunker shot, you want the clubhead to turn over and release, which will give you more distance. To encourage a full release, straighten your right arm through the hitting area. Extending the right elbow will allow the clubhead to accelerate faster through the sand, hitting the ball the required distance.

Posted 14 October, 2017 by E. Marino in Golf.com

How to pitch it closer and attack every pin   Leave a comment

You play well, but you want to shave those last few strokes off your handicap. Pitching it closer is a guaranteed way to save shots every single round.

HOW TO PITCH IT CLOSE TO ANY PIN

Pin position is everything when it comes to planning and executing an effective pitch shot. Here’s how to attack a short pin, which requires the ball to quickly sit down, and a long pin, which will demand plenty of roll.

SHORT PIN: USE LOFT TO MAKE THE BALL SIT
LOW HANDICAPPER
If there’s little room between you and the pin, take your most lofted wedge, play the ball forward in your stance, and open the face a few degrees.

You’re 20 yards off the green, with a pin cut near the green’s front edge. To stop the ball quickly, use your most lofted wedge and play the ball forward in your stance, to increase the club’s effective loft.

A heads-up: The clubface will want to close and point left of your target, so open the face a few degrees and check that you’re properly aimed.

Posted 9 September, 2017 by E. Marino in Golf.com, Pitch, Tips

For consistent ballstriking, use an magazine   Leave a comment

PLLongDo you struggle to hit good irons consistently, round after round?

You may suffer from a poor setup. To fix this, take an issue of magazine and lay it on the ground, with the front and back covers face up. Assume your address using a mid-iron and position the ball opposite the magazine’s spine, with the instep of each foot opposite the outer edges. Align your hands with the spine so that the shaft leans slightly toward the target.

Bend from the hips enough so that your eyes are over the magazine’s top edge. Your arms should hang naturally from your shoulders, placing the butt of the club over the bottom edge of the issue. Master these setup positions and you can expect to hit a lot more greens.

For consistent ballstriking, use a magazine as your setup guide. Align the ball with the spine, and get the instep of each foot even with the magazine’s outer edges.

Bend from the hips until your eyes are even with the top edge of the magazine, and let your arms hang down.

Posted 9 September, 2017 by E. Marino in Golf.com, Tips

Loft it high from a bunker with ease   Leave a comment

loft-from-bunker-leadFor most weekend golfers, the typical greenside bunker shot is already an ordeal to be avoided. Toss in a towering bunker face and an overhanging lip, and that sand shot can make you feel like you’re in a remake of Escape From Alcatraz. Good news: Freeing yourself is easier than you think. Just copy the following setup and swing adjustments, and you’ll loft the ball higher, making the most penal hazards look easy.

 

 

 

SETUP: GO EXTRA WIDE

 SENIOR PLAYER Take an extra-wide stance, with your feet outside your shoulders. Dial the clubface slightly open and hold your hands as low as they can comfortably go. Then angle the shaft back so that the grip end of the club is clearly behind the ball, pointing just to the right of your belly button. This will make it easier to throw the clubhead under the ball, which will add much-needed loft to the shot.

Take a wide stance (as you might use with your driver), open the clubface and tilt the shaft back. This position will allow you to get maximum loft out of the clubhead

SWING: GO EXTRA STEEP

 SENIOR PLAYER As you start back, pick the club up steeply with your arms, quickly pointing the clubhead to the sky. Don’t worry about a big shoulder turn or getting your arms to a certain position—this shot is all about the angle of attack. From the top, swing down steeply along your stance line, throwing the clubhead under the ball with nice speed. As the club exits the sand, pull your hands and the club in tight to your body. This will ensure that the clubhead travels upward through impact, adding loft to the face and extra height to your shot.

This shot requires a steep angle of attack on both sides of the ball. Take the club straight up to the top in the backswing, follow that same path down to the ball, and then pull the club in tight and finish with a steep follow-through.

Posted 12 July, 2017 by E. Marino in Golf.com

The power backswing: 3 musts for longer drives   Leave a comment

The game’s longest hitters do a tremendous job loading and storing energy in the backswing, which they then unleash into the ball. The result? Mammoth blasts. The modern power player doesn’t hurry on the way back—it’s a smooth, gradual accumulation of power. Here are three power backswing moves you can make to help you launch your biggest drives ever.

1. TRACE A WIDE SWING ARC

 STRAIGHT HITTER  As you swing back, try to keep your left arm as straight as possible without locking it in place. The goal is to get your hands as far away from your right ear as possible at the top of the backswing. This creates width—and the wider your swing arc, the more time the clubhead has to travel and accumulate power-generating speed.

Make your backswing arc as wide as you can, for more stored energy in the downswing. A simple way to do this is to focus on keeping your hands as far from your right ear as possible without locking your left elbow.

2. KEEP THE RIGHT KNEE FLEXED

 STRAIGHT HITTER  Few backswings are longer than John Daly’s, yet he never loses his balance or posture. That’s because he keeps the flex in his right knee. This creates a stable platform for your hips to turn around, and it shifts your weight onto the inside of your right foot, making it easier to rotate your hips and shift your weight forward on the downswing.

Don’t lock your right knee in the backswing. Maintaining some flex here helps you load a max amount of energy into your right leg, fueling bigger hits.

3. MAKE A FULL SHOULDER TURN

 STRAIGHT HITTER  Make the biggest shoulder turn you can in your backswing while still maintaining your posture. This creates more energy and perfectly positions you to swing down on a powerful "inside-out" path. To promote a full shoulder turn, place a shaft on the ground just inside your right foot, and, with a driver lodged across your chest, turn until the butt end of the grip points behind the shaft on the ground.

To get a feel for a full shoulder turn, hold a driver across your chest and swing back until the butt end points at a clubshaft on the ground near your back foot

Posted 9 July, 2017 by E. Marino in Golf.com